Eat

Eat

Roasted parsnips – Sült paszternák

One of the quite often neglected root vegetables are white parsnips.  A lot of people don’t know them or don’t use them in their cooking.  For me, they are as essential as carrots – they are closely related to carrots and parsley roots – especially for vegetable or meat soups.

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Quick quinoa salad – Gyors quinoa saláta

Quinoa is one of those whole grains with high protein content that cooks very quickly.  It’s actually a seed and has a nutty taste; its origins are in South America.  To make a tasty quinoa salad is just a matter of 25-30 minutes.  There are endless variations to this salad depending on what you like or what is available in your refrigerator.

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Cheese and apple puffs – Sajtos almás párna

From the moment I discovered Nigel Slater’s cookbooks, his TV-show on BBC, and his recipes in The Guardian, I was hooked.  I like his writing a lot.  I like his style of talking about food, but most importantly, the simplicity of his recipes.  I started creating and re-creating what I read, and what I watched online.

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Roasted spiced carrots – Sült fűszeres sárgarépa

My friend Tricia is a vegetarian.  I had the good fortune to nourish her at our dining table a few times throughout the years, which has inspired me to focus more on vegetables and incorporate them into our diet more frequently.  Now we live a few hundred miles away from each other.  I hope through some of my postings she might be able to get ideas for her own cooking.  I would like to dedicate all of these vegetarian recipes to her.

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Yeast-raised waffles – Élesztős gofri

In the last two months at work, two of my colleagues surprised me with two different issues of this year’s SAVEUR magazine.  Kathy thought I would enjoy the article on Hungarian cooking in the October 2013 issue – yes, I did very much – and Peter, while giving me a bunch of architectural and gardening magazines, maybe threw into the mix the January/February issue just for variety.  In the past, I didn’t pay too much attention to cooking magazines (no time really to read magazines), but when a few days ago Peter asked for my opinion about the proper temperature […]

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Hungarian apple tart – Almás pite

The Hungarian word pite is not easy to translate into English.  My dictionary says: pite – fruit-flan, pie, tart, and for almás pite – apple tart/turnover.  Other sources call it apple cake.  The name doesn’t really matter – the two flaky buttery crusts, bottom and top, filled with cinnamon flavored apples make one of the classic Hungarian pastry staples.